Monday, March 21, 2011

Pub rules for the blind

On my way home last night, I took a detour to visit the nearest thing I have to a local pub. It isn't on our Island, so "local" is a stretch, but it is one of the best pubs in Seattle. It is called the Beveridge Place. No, that is not a spelling mistake, it happens to be the name of the street where the pub sits. It doesn't serve food, but does allow you to bring your own, from many of the good restaurants nearby. I love the easy chairs and sofas as much as I like the beer, of which there is always a fantastic selection, especially IPA's which this region excels in. It was while sitting on the former drinking the latter that I noticed a well designed laminated leaflet sitting on the table. Not having my specs on, I thought it was a new drinks menu, so I picked it up, only to find out it was a list of rules for both dogs and dog owners, specifically for seeing eye dogs as they are called over here. It politely pointed out that, in fact, the newly upholstered furniture was not done for their benefit. I assume that they must have had a serious problem with dogs reclining on the easy chairs after a hard day's work. I know that guide dogs for the blind provide a wonderful service for their owners, but reading leaflets on pub tables probably isn't one of them.

12 comments:

  1. That's funny.The New Pub has always allowed dogs so I suppose we'll have to draw up a policy.
    Unexpectedly there's also a weekly traditional folk music evening which you must come to next time you're over.
    Last Saturday: 10 hammer dulcimers, a harpist,guitarists,Northumbrian Pipers-it was amazing, you would have loved it.

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  2. NS - I think you should book Legend to play at your pub next time he's over. we can get a contingent of bloggers to come and drink your drink and eat your food :-) Also, I need to know about the hair-cutting incident. Where is it?

    Legend - sounds like a fine place to go for a drink. I've never been anywhere that allows you to bring in food from elsewhere - sounds v civilised.

    AX

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  3. That's helpful a printed list for guide dogs!! I'm smiling at the dogs reclining on an easy chair! It sounds like a lovely place to drink. Hope all's well with you my friend xx

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  4. our local pub allows dogs to visit (with their owners of course) and I love this homely policy... the dogs have to be well behaved and dog and owner asked to leave if not. It makes the whole community a friendlier place.... and means I can come in for a pint half way through my walk!

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  5. brilliant.......what a funny picture you do paint...i suppose every dog needs it's pub!!

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  6. Ha ha, that's hilarious. People are strange! x

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  7. I would love to go there although I think my dogs would be barred .. after living where we do and no locals we are all a bit feral here xx

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  8. ok, that's really funny - probably true that one of the things the guide dogs don't do as assistance to their blind companions, is read. Not the menu or the rules!! Love it! It reminds me of the agency where I work for people with multiple disabilities. If you call the office, a loop of verbiage goes round and round (driving you crazy while you are on hold of course) but in it it says "if you are blind or deaf" !?!?!?! ok, if you are deaf? on the phone? listening to the loop?
    Can a seeing eye dog read for its blind owner?
    btw what are "seeing eye dogs" called where you are from? Just wondering

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  9. TCFO. In England, they are called blind dogs, or guide dogs

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  10. That is hysterical. Only in America, man.

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  11. Hilarious. Thanks for the belly laugh today. The image of reclining dogs after a hard days work was priceless.

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